Hello | tiny habits, coach, more about me

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I am a Tiny Habits Certified Coach with specialty coaching of An Improv Mindset in the Workspace. Recently, coaches had an opportunity to introduce (virtually) ourselves to each other , for which I share here, my responses to the six prompted questions –

1) Where do you live?
2) Why did you become a Tiny Habits Certified Coach?
3) How long you have been a Tiny Habits Certified Coach?
4) What is your Tiny Habits Coach specialty? (If you haven’t defined one yet, that is ok. If you have more than one, please list them all.)
5) Share an interesting or unique fact about yourself.
6) Share anything else that you would like other coaches to know.

Below are my responses (some edited) in “short” and “long” versions.

Short Version

1) California, USA

2) I became hooked on Tiny Habits in January 2012. Then I wanted not only to formally share and memorialize my experience/expertise but also to complement my consulting and applied improvisation services.

3) 2 years (certified Nov 2013)

4) My Tiny Habits Coach specialty:
**An IMPROV MINDSET in the WORKSPACE **
where I bring together behavior design, tiny habits, and applied improvisation to coach folks in environmental health & safety practices, professional development, diversity and equity awareness, and leadership.

xojane_morning face5) An interesting fact about myself – I was one of 75 readers of xoJane (dot) com who was featured in their “75 of Your Gorgeous Morning Faces — Featuring No Makeup” where we were asked to submit on a Friday morning “our faces as we looked on our pillows.”

6) For earning my living and experiencing life, I am interconnecting different interests and endeavors. I have been a performing improviser since 2011, and if you are an improviser – “Hello fellow cult member!” (I completed the iO Chicago 5-wk intensive this 2015 summer!) Oh – one more “cult” of which I am part – I love Fluevog shoes.

Long Version

  • I live in the U.S., California, in a part of the San Francisco (SF) Bay Area, on the East Bay side, ~ a 35-min drive from SF.
  • boot camp_dog tagAfter my first 5-day session of Tiny Habits (TH) in January 2012, I became hooked on (and addicted to) the simplicity, results, and fun. In June 2012, I completed BJ Fogg’s Behavior Design Bootcamp. I quickly started experimenting more with TH in and for the workspace – making one’s workday experience not suck. I chose to become a TH Certified Coach not only to formally share and memorialize my experience/expertise but also to complement my consulting and applied improvisation services.
  • Since late-Nov 2013, I have been a Tiny Habits Certified Coach.
  • My Tiny Habits Coach specialty:
    ** An IMPROV MINDSET in the WORKSPACE **
    where I bring together behavior design, tiny habits, and applied improvisation to coach folks in environmental health & safety practices, professional development, diversity awareness, and leadership.I apply the Tiny Habits method at the intersection of Behavior Design and Improvisation in the areas I LOVE -* Building Environmental Health & Safety Habits
    * Self-Mentoring for Professional Development
    * Diversity, Culture, and Bias Recontextualized
    * On Becoming and Being a Servant Leader
  • For earning my living and experiencing life, I am interconnecting my interests and endeavors –

Environmental Consulting (think air quality and power plants)
Behavior Designer / Anthrocubeologist (a coined term)
Tiny Habits Certified Coach (profile yet to be posted)
Improviser (performing since 2011, think unscripted sketch), and
Servant Leader philosophies and The Way (via Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership)

I have been a performing improviser since 2011, and if you are an improviser – “Hello fellow cult member!” (I completed the iO Chicago 5-wk intensive this 2015 summer!)

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from week 3 of 2015 iO Summer Intensive – Section 4, aka Backup Pants, aka Wizard Lobsters

Oh – one more “cult” of which I am part – I love Fluevog shoes.

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(Yes, this is John Fluevog at the Haight Street, San Francisco store.)

 

Listening | as improvisers, as workspace colleagues

REBLOG. See original at Anthrocubeology.com

Listening – As Improvisers, As Workspace Colleagues

VVaughn_listening

From Vince Vaughn’s quote (above image) about listening when improvising –

  • unexpected information

  • staying true to your character, who you are

  • reacting honestly

  • discovering a different direction

– it is my observation (and experience) that these four things also happen to varying degrees in the workspace. In fact, here is Vaughn’s quote when replacing the words improvising with interacting in a workspace and scene with workspace 

The main thing about interacting in a workspace is listening so if something happens that wasn’t expected and you know your character, you know what has to happen in the workspace, you can react to that in a way that is honest and it might take you in a different direction to go the same place.
– Anthrocubeologist
(plagiarizing-ish from V. Vaughn)

About this post

As a follow-up to Feedback – As Improvisers, As Workspace Colleagues , for which listening is an important skill for receiving and giving feedback, this post presents –

As a specialty coach for An Improv Mindset in the Workspace, trained to help people change behaviors and easily develop habits, I understand how to translate improv practices and philosophies for use in a non-performance context – specifically, for the traditional workspace.

In a follow-up post, I will include an opportunity to be a habit detective for listening, e.g., observing, gathering information, speculating on other practices for listening. For now, consider the following for listening in the workspace.

Simply Listening, Listening Simply

One of the key practices of every improviser is listening. I shared in Feedback that workspace interactions are not too different from the relationship-based interactions between two improvisers performing a scene. Listening is not only important for performing improvisers but also for anyone involved in workspace interactions among peers, management, customers, community stakeholders, shareholders, and competitors.

As an improviser, I practice making the four choices in progression, while listening to my scene partner –

  • hear

  • understand

  • react

  • respond

Choosing to hear, then understand, then react, and then respond serves as the foundation for exercising one’s listening muscle. As an improviser, what I co-create in an on-stage, performance-based scene with my scene partner is contingent upon my listening skills.

Here is an improviser Paul Vaillancourt’s The Four Step Process – Improv Tip #3, which addresses how to listen better and listen with a purpose.

  • What did they say? What were the words – literally – that they said?

  • What do I think that means?

  • How do I think and feel about what they just said?

  • What am I going to say and do about that?

(This post is a stand-alone post specific to listening and separate from the two improv tips Vaillancourt references in his video – What They Just Said – Improv Tip #2 and Playing Paranoid #1.)

Listening with An Improv Mindset in the Workspace

Workspace interactions are not too different from the relationship-based interactions between two improvisers performing a scene. How does listening as an improviser – hear, understand, react, respond –  translate for those in the workspace? Consider this approach.

Did I hear (physically) what was said?

Hear. If not, be honest. You can say that you did not hear what was stated and that would like the person to repeat what was stated. In fact, how often do you ask (and care) to acknowledge what you heard?

Do I understand what I heard?

Understand. If not, take a breath, ask questions, and check-in. You can ask for clarifications. You can check-in to confirm your understanding, state what you understood, and if you would like, include your interpretation of what was stated. Likewise, how often do you ask (and care) to make sure you understood what was said, as well as what was intended to be heard?

What is my reaction – physically, emotionally, intellectually – to what I heard?

React. Be your own research scientist or detective. Start collecting data about yourself. Be self-aware. Do you have a physical tell, make a sound, start processing what you are going to say, check-out, or some other reaction or combination of reactions? Does your reaction change depending on the environment?

Subtext. Something to be aware of – subtext. In a performance context, subtext is the underlying meaning created by the speaker, whose manner of speaking may be conveying an additional meaning of what was spoken. In a non-performance context, such as the workspace, subtext also exists. (For this post, subtext is not addressed.)

Which communication option(s) will I use?

Respond. It is your turn to interact. Traditional approaches for responding include verbal responses, written responses (electronic, old school pen to paper), sign language responses, and in some cases (for whatever reasons) no responses. And for the first three approaches, the timing of responses can differ from choosing an on-the-spot, immediate response to choosing a response after some time has passed.

That said, how do people in your world listen to each other? What are your observations and experiences? As a non-improviser, I would love to know the following –

What qualities do you think make one person a better listener than another? Is listening a habit that you actively practice? If so, what practice(s) do you have? If not, what would you like to practice?

– – – –

I am gathering and sharing my thoughts as I evolve ANTHROCUBEOLOGY – INSPIRED by IMPROV, a CATALYST for WORKSPACE CULTURAL SHIFTS through TINY CHANGES.

Reimagine | habit coach, start small, short + focus, celebrate

Designing for behavior change is systematic.
It’s not guesswork.

– BJ Fogg

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with BJ Fogg after June 2012 Behavior Design Boot Camp (over here)

I am a Tiny Habits® Certified Coach, trained by Linda Fogg Phillips (on web) and BJ Fogg (on Twitterweb). I completed my training in November 2013. I also am an alum of BJ’s June 2012 Behavior Design Boot Camp.

I am trained to help people shift and change behaviors and easily develop habits.

Specialty Area

Inspired by servant leadership, I am a coach at the intersection of Behavior Design and Improvisation. In June 2013, I co-presented my perspective – Who’s a Servant-Leader Anyway?  (.pdf) – at the 23rd Annual Conference of the Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership.  My specialty area is applying Improv in the Workspace. I work with people who have specific workspace and professional development goals. As an overview, I share my perspectives of the benefits of choosing an improv mindset in the workspace.

20-article-hr-rm-gettyimages-479977913Life Reimagined

This post is to pass along an article (October 2014) – Could a Tiny Habit Shape Your Success? The simple formula for creating lasting change – in Psychology Today’s section From Functioning to Floursishing. The author, Michelle McQuaid, describes the simplicity of BJ’s tiny habits  –

Scale back change to something very small
Design a place for your new behavior
Create a tiny habit recipe
Celebrate your success
Build your habit day-by-day

– as well as sharing a podcast of her interview with BJ Fogg.

In fact, this blog post includes BJ’s TEDx Maui talk of his favorite habit and what he now calls the Maui Habit – “After my feet touch the floor in the morning, I will say It’s going to be a great day.”

As shared in the article, a habit can be expressed as “After ____, I will ____”, and it is immediately followed by celebrating.  I very much like how the author has described Celebrate

Celebrate your success – Emotions create habits.  Behaviors are either more automatic or less automatic and the way you shift it along the automaticity scale is through your emotional reactions. When you complete your tiny habit reward yourself with an “Awesome!” or “Good for me!”, to affirm to yourself that this a behavior you’re proud of.  Of course you’re not really celebrating having read just one page, but rather that you’re showing up and changing a behavior that you’ve decided is important.

– which essentially is having a happy feeling. All this happens in seconds – not in minutes, not because of marking off a to-do checklist item, not touching an app to note completion – just doing a very small habit with a happy feeling to punctuate it.

What healthy habit do you want to create or shift?
How do you create habits?
What do you like (or not like) about BJ Fogg’s approach?